How to make a good villain backstory

x2 This backstory description generator will generate a fairly random description of either a fortunate or unfortunate backstory depending on your choice. These backstories will fit respectable characters best, though some could be used for villainous characters as well. But there will be a separate backstory generator for villains in the future.Greed - The non-humans of the world have access to riches and villain boy wants them. Dwarven gold, gnomish gems, dragon-born silver, halfling tobacco, elvish magic-items, Aarakocra down, etc, etc. Power - Only humans worship Hades. All the other gods are worshipped by non-humans.And because of that, General Hummel has more depth and is more engaging as a villain. 2. Colonel Hans Landa in Inglorious Basterds. Landa's monologue offers us a haunting look into the utter evil of the Nazi mindset. He goes on about rats, questioning the farmer on why there is such instant disdain for the rodent.If there is some emotional torment keeping your protagonist from accomplishing what he needs to, there should be a solid history to back it up. Write a complete history for all your characters before you begin, even if you use only enough to give the audience insight into your hero's psyche. Plot your story around the emotional aspect of the story.First up, what makes a good superpower? "That is one of the most difficult things to come up with when doing a story, because it's as though they've all been done," Lee said. "Super strength, the...The motivation will not completely exonerate your villain from his actions, but it will give the reader a reason to believe him. "Great characters need to be real, engaging, and motivating; they need to keep the reader reading. They need to touch something in the reader; so that they are remembered.". Magdalena Ball.Your villain must be suitable and specifically adept at preventing the thematic success of your hero, hence must embody a negative version of that theme. 2. Create A Compelling Backstory So, once you have understood your theme and decided which negative version of the theme is embodied by your villain, you next ask yourself why they are like this.V. Human (Lucky) Outlander Drunken Master Monk. One day John Fellow looked up from scratching the muddy soil with a stick and looked at the horizon. He looked back at the mud and despair of the surroundings of his fellow serfs and thought about what his future might hold. Likely an early grave due to disease.So conjure a backstory for your villain. Make him real and believable and credible—even attractive in many ways. And while you're writing your story, see how many boxes you can check off on this list of characteristics that pertain to your villain. The more that apply, the more successful your novel is likely to be.5. Make her redeemable. This is the reason why the antagonist's backstory is important, and so are her values and reasons behind her actions. You can make her character redeemable. This does not mean that she will go down the path of redemption and become a protagonist. All you need to present is the possibility.6 DARTH VADER. A spectacular space-opera like Star Wars needs a tragic villain like Vader. He is a man who has essentially sold his soul for the power of the Dark Side. He's lost so much on his rise to power, that he essentially seals his fraction of humanity away behind a cybernetic shell.The Riddler is a prime example of the fun to be had by a Batman B-lister. While the majority of Batman villains are fairly heavy hitters, Edward Nygma just gets to kick around Gotham City leaving ...A villain is an "evil" character in a story, whether a historical narrative or, especially, a work of fiction. The villain is usually the bad guy or antagonist, the character who fights against the hero or protagonist.A female villain is sometimes called a villainess.Random House Unabridged Dictionary defines villain as "a cruelly malicious person who is involved in or devoted to wickedness or ...They have a soft spot for puppies or they write cheesy love poems. Contrary personality traits add depth and realism to all characters. Describe your villain's positive traits. Put your villain in a scene: make sure you include dialogue so you can work out how the character speaks. Give your villain a distinct voice.A Simple Guide for Writing a GREAT Character Backstory. Complexity is the enemy of clarity. So here is a simple formula. Turn back the clock, if you will, all the way to the creation of your character's backstory. No, Tommy, not literally. It's a figure of speech. Besides, Tommy, that's an analog clock. You'd just be spinning….Instead, show the history behind your villain’s behaviour. To make your villain a complex product of their own backstory and their society, show the personal attributes (psychology and backstory) and external circumstances (societal values and norms) that contribute to or enable their behaviour. 3: Show how your villain wasn’t always the bad guy If there is some emotional torment keeping your protagonist from accomplishing what he needs to, there should be a solid history to back it up. Write a complete history for all your characters before you begin, even if you use only enough to give the audience insight into your hero's psyche. Plot your story around the emotional aspect of the story.Whatever you want to be and whatever you want to accomplish, you need to decide what that is and then make sure that every action you take is in line with achieving that goal. Tip 2: Come up with a backstory that shows development The last thing you want to do is have a backstory that doesn't show any development.A character arc, however, is one more way to develop a more complex villain. 7. Connected to Theme. The best stories grow out of theme. Everything in the story flows out of a central concept like "love never dies," "nice guys finish last," or "hard work pays off.".finally, you can hook readers by showing a character willing to give up or actually sacrificing a selfish goal for someone or something else, or for the greater good: like gandalf falling to the balrog in the fellowship of the ring to allow frodo to escape with the one true ring, or cyrano de bergerac sacrificing his own happiness for his love …First, Focus on the Villain. To maintain control over where and how you add information about your villain, first, you need to know your villain well. A rich character background allows you to pull various pieces of information out and plant them in your story. Think of your background as data collection. Then drip various pieces of information ...A Simple Guide for Writing a GREAT Character Backstory. Complexity is the enemy of clarity. So here is a simple formula. Turn back the clock, if you will, all the way to the creation of your character's backstory. No, Tommy, not literally. It's a figure of speech. Besides, Tommy, that's an analog clock. You'd just be spinning….Usually, the earlier you can foreshadow an event, the stronger and more cohesive an effect you will create. The bigger the event, the more important it is to foreshadow it early. As editor Jeff Gerke puts it in The First 50 Pages: Basically, you need to let us in on the rules.Read on for our top 6 reasons villains are better than heroes: 1. They're complex. Don't you get tired of the shiny, golden, all-around good guy hero trope? How can anyone be that perfect? Our favorite villains have a back story as to why they're evil, and it's soooo much more interesting watching the decisions they make because of it. 2.The value of backstory. Take 60% as a minimum of unrevealed backstory, and try to decide on as much of your character's life as possible. The more backstory you know the more realistic the character will be, and the more realistic the 40% you actually share will feel. Believability lies in seemingly inconsequential details, and it's ... secret codes not working samsung 5. Make her redeemable. This is the reason why the antagonist's backstory is important, and so are her values and reasons behind her actions. You can make her character redeemable. This does not mean that she will go down the path of redemption and become a protagonist. All you need to present is the possibility.Step 1: Motivate Your Villain. A villain with a motivation is a ticking time bomb. When you give your villains powerful motivations, they take over the story. They raise the stakes, they hold the tension, and they force the hero to take drastic action.Every good villain has finesse. It's what sets them apart from the "goons" or the basic "bad guys" in the movie or show. They possess a certain style that sets them apart from the others in a completely different way. Example: a Joker goon vs The Joker himself.-Character. The villain has to have a reason for being "the villain".2. Make your monsters lovable. If you think about the most endearing—and enduring—characters in the history of literature they are the ones that are not simply portrayed as black and white evil, but with shades of coloring. Think about Dracula—he is a monster but he has huge charisma and charm.Villains aren't as important to the romance novel as the hero and heroine, but in many stories, they are crucial. The villain's actions can drive the hero and heroine to succeed against all odds, force them to make difficult decisions, even drive them apart for a while. However, romance writers walk a delicate tightrope when creating villains.The motivation will not completely exonerate your villain from his actions, but it will give the reader a reason to believe him. "Great characters need to be real, engaging, and motivating; they need to keep the reader reading. They need to touch something in the reader; so that they are remembered.". Magdalena Ball.So conjure a backstory for your villain. Make him real and believable and credible—even attractive in many ways. And while you're writing your story, see how many boxes you can check off on this list of characteristics that pertain to your villain. The more that apply, the more successful your novel is likely to be.Whatever you want to be and whatever you want to accomplish, you need to decide what that is and then make sure that every action you take is in line with achieving that goal. Tip 2: Come up with a backstory that shows development The last thing you want to do is have a backstory that doesn't show any development.V. Human (Lucky) Outlander Drunken Master Monk. One day John Fellow looked up from scratching the muddy soil with a stick and looked at the horizon. He looked back at the mud and despair of the surroundings of his fellow serfs and thought about what his future might hold. Likely an early grave due to disease.As Mckee says: Likeability is no guarantee of audience involvement, it's just an aspect of characterization.". The 'glue of empathy' is what binds us to the anti-hero and the anti-villain and we hold a level of fascination for them. If done well, we remember them years after watching or reading about them.Backstory. Whether you're writing a hero or a villain, backstory is important. One note characters who are just evil for the heck of it or good because that's what's right are boring. Throw a wrench in your readers' expectations by giving villains something sympathetic in their background. The villain doesn't have to be beloved.Giving the Villain a Backstory Download Article 1 Give the villain a distinct name. Their name should make them stand out from the crowd and give off sinister undertones. It may relate to a nickname they were given as a child or to an event in their past. It may also connect to their physical features. [7]Every good villain has finesse. It's what sets them apart from the "goons" or the basic "bad guys" in the movie or show. They possess a certain style that sets them apart from the others in a completely different way. Example: a Joker goon vs The Joker himself.-Character. The villain has to have a reason for being "the villain".V. Human (Lucky) Outlander Drunken Master Monk. One day John Fellow looked up from scratching the muddy soil with a stick and looked at the horizon. He looked back at the mud and despair of the surroundings of his fellow serfs and thought about what his future might hold. Likely an early grave due to disease.The best villains are fully developed human beings. Unless you're writing fantasy or sci fi with demons and so on, in which case your demons probably should also be fully developed beings with wants and needs, strengths and weaknesses, and all the rest of what goes into creating a character. Alisha Garcia Lives in Gonzales Texas 1 yI've always found it most helpful to answer questionnaires in my character's voice, so I have written this addressing your antagonist directly. Try to answer in the way he or she would. You'll uncover hidden backstory, depth, and softness in your antagonist. But remember - even something "soft" ( like empathy) can be a terrible motivator.The evil villain generator generates evil villains, the evil villain plot and how the evil villain dies. ... I've always wanted a good evil villain generator, but this one is by far the best i_killed_cupid 2021-10-17 16:29:28. This is the best evil villain name generator I've ever used! There are so many options to choose from and they are all ...Every good villain has finesse. It's what sets them apart from the "goons" or the basic "bad guys" in the movie or show. They possess a certain style that sets them apart from the others in a completely different way. Example: a Joker goon vs The Joker himself.-Character. The villain has to have a reason for being "the villain". kansas city star obituaries 5. Have a devious sense of humor. Develop a dark sense of humor like the Joker, especially if you're playing a villain with a more comedic role. Find something funny that may be horrifying to others. Humor will help make your villain more relatable and likable to an audience.A Simple Guide for Writing a GREAT Character Backstory. Complexity is the enemy of clarity. So here is a simple formula. Turn back the clock, if you will, all the way to the creation of your character's backstory. No, Tommy, not literally. It's a figure of speech. Besides, Tommy, that's an analog clock. You'd just be spinning….Greed - The non-humans of the world have access to riches and villain boy wants them. Dwarven gold, gnomish gems, dragon-born silver, halfling tobacco, elvish magic-items, Aarakocra down, etc, etc. Power - Only humans worship Hades. All the other gods are worshipped by non-humans.A villain's motivation isn't a straight line. It's easy to fall into certain patterns when writing villains; one of the most frequent being to draw a straight line between an event from their past and their actions in the present. Someone murdered their loved one, therefore they seek revenge. Someone injured them, therefore they want to ...The infamous quote of a child singing when Momo appears on a cartoon.Momo, Momo, Momo is going to kill you. Do you want a surprise? Look in her eyes. I will not lie, you're going to die.A line from the Momo Challenge Song. Momo is an Internet urban legend originating in 2018. She appears to be a young woman with long black hair, huge bulging eyes, a huge mouth with a big smile, and she appears ...A villain is an "evil" character in a story, whether a historical narrative or, especially, a work of fiction. The villain is usually the bad guy or antagonist, the character who fights against the hero or protagonist.A female villain is sometimes called a villainess.Random House Unabridged Dictionary defines villain as "a cruelly malicious person who is involved in or devoted to wickedness or ...Step 4: Write the Game Story. When you have your world, your characters, and your Grand Story, it is time to take a tiny little piece of all that fluff. It is like framing a photo so that only a little bit is visible. You zoom in, and leave things out. Only tell the things that are important.This Would Actually Make A Good Villain Backstory LittleSnowCloud. Chapter 4: Burn Me At The Stake, Maybe At Least My Soul Will Be Clean Notes: (See the end of the chapter for notes.) Chapter Text. Shouta's hands were gentle, tracing patterns on his chest, his arms, his shoulders, his neck, his thighs, just brushing the skin, everywhere ...Design your own evil character with an effective backstory that gives your supervillain motivation from start to finish. 8. Create an intriguing and clashing relationship between both the hero and the supervillain. They may be complete opposites, but they should have just as convincing histories and motives. 9.My second book isn't a true sequel, i.e., the protagonist is different, and only one of the characters from the first story plays an active or dramatic role in the second story. She starts out as a friend and ends up being a villain, of sorts (not the typical villain; just someone with opposing interests.)My second book isn't a true sequel, i.e., the protagonist is different, and only one of the characters from the first story plays an active or dramatic role in the second story. She starts out as a friend and ends up being a villain, of sorts (not the typical villain; just someone with opposing interests.)It's either a way to introduce your characters, show their ending, or reveal their plan. you can use them to tell the backstory, to show what drives them, or even to subvert audience expectations. You want to brainstorm where the monologue will occur first, then work out what it needs to say in the individual scene first. Then work backward.We simply stop caring about why said villain is hell-bent on making the protagonist of a film or television show suffer. A backstory can either make or break a villain in a way that's entirely different than with a protagonist. Why? Because we need to believe that the subterranean evil in all of us must have good reason to rise to the surface.It makes your villain want to strike up a friendship. Buy them a drink. Trade some stories. Find out they have a few other things in common, including not being entirely evil. For complementarity: The partner is good at something your villain isn't good at. This could, for example, just be humor, the partner's jokes make him laugh.They have a soft spot for puppies or they write cheesy love poems. Contrary personality traits add depth and realism to all characters. Describe your villain's positive traits. Put your villain in a scene: make sure you include dialogue so you can work out how the character speaks. Give your villain a distinct voice.Villains aren't as important to the romance novel as the hero and heroine, but in many stories, they are crucial. The villain's actions can drive the hero and heroine to succeed against all odds, force them to make difficult decisions, even drive them apart for a while. However, romance writers walk a delicate tightrope when creating villains.A villain protagonist, on the other hand, is generally evil, with no guarantee that they will turn into a hero by the end of the story. Image via Unsplash. Creating an evil protagonist is a skill you can work at, just like any part of creative writing. But before you venture forth, make sure the villain is the perfect choice to lead your story.V. Human (Lucky) Outlander Drunken Master Monk. One day John Fellow looked up from scratching the muddy soil with a stick and looked at the horizon. He looked back at the mud and despair of the surroundings of his fellow serfs and thought about what his future might hold. Likely an early grave due to disease.Instead, show the history behind your villain’s behaviour. To make your villain a complex product of their own backstory and their society, show the personal attributes (psychology and backstory) and external circumstances (societal values and norms) that contribute to or enable their behaviour. 3: Show how your villain wasn’t always the bad guy Here's how to write a D&D backstory: You create a D&D backstory by developing a character concept, writing 2-3 representative personality traits, highlighting 3-5 pivotal life events, and defining their fears, obsessions, secrets, motivations, family, and appearance. You can also use a template and automatic background generator.2. The beast: A classic villain whose goal is to terrorize and attempt to defeat the main character, the beast is a literal monster. This type of villain cannot be reasoned with and is often found in the horror or science fiction genres. The whale from Moby Dick and the shark from Jaws are examples of this type of villain.Answer (1 of 7): MOTIVATION Im my opinion the villain in any novel needs a strong Goal and motivation. He shouldn't do evil works just because he is villain, his motivation should seem rational and big. SMARTNESS He need not be cruel or psychotic or mentally unstable but he definitely needs to...Instead, show the history behind your villain's behaviour. To make your villain a complex product of their own backstory and their society, show the personal attributes (psychology and backstory) and external circumstances (societal values and norms) that contribute to or enable their behaviour. 3: Show how your villain wasn't always the bad guyHere are 5 quick steps to create kick-ass villains. 1. Understand Their Why. Some people use character interviews or sheets to develop their villain; others wing it as they go. Both ways work. But the one vital piece of information you do need to know is - why your villain is doing what he's doing.Mar 21, 2022 · Give your villain a motivation that they are so dedicated that they are willing to lose anything, give up anything, kill anyone, or die for. Thanos is one example of this. He is so dedicated to his mission of getting the Infinity Stones and snapping half of all life on Earth out of existence that he will stop at nothing. The Shadow Lord is a good lesson in how to make a cool villain, even if they aren't all that particularly interesting. With great art direction and a killer boss theme, Shadow Lord is intimidating even if you're unfamiliar with his backstory or motive in Final Fantasy XI. Even though he falls toward the bottom of our list, he is no stranger to evil as he was the catalyst that sprung the ...How can I create a good villian backstory +3 votes . 131 views. asked May 3, 2021 in How-To by Thalia. Ok 1. A beautiful sweet girl who is a villain 2. Your average teenager I,m terrible at thinking of motives. #advice;Greed - The non-humans of the world have access to riches and villain boy wants them. Dwarven gold, gnomish gems, dragon-born silver, halfling tobacco, elvish magic-items, Aarakocra down, etc, etc. Power - Only humans worship Hades. All the other gods are worshipped by non-humans.6 DARTH VADER. A spectacular space-opera like Star Wars needs a tragic villain like Vader. He is a man who has essentially sold his soul for the power of the Dark Side. He's lost so much on his rise to power, that he essentially seals his fraction of humanity away behind a cybernetic shell.So conjure a backstory for your villain. Make him real and believable and credible—even attractive in many ways. And while you're writing your story, see how many boxes you can check off on this list of characteristics that pertain to your villain. The more that apply, the more successful your novel is likely to be.Don't make your villain an anti-social misfit. Improve your story by giving the villain charm. This way, the villain can even seduce the reader. This has the dual effect of pulling the reader in and then, once the villain inevitably acts villainous, giving the reader cause to sympathize with the villain's victims.A particular Deconstruction of the villain, a Tragic Villain is completely aware of their evil but takes little to no pleasure from it; in fact, they could very well resent the evil they are committing. Rather, they were driven to villainy due to circumstances beyond their control.In many circumstances they are the Tragic Monster, perhaps an innocent person transformed into a mindless monster ...Try writing up a story that has your character wanting small but within easy reach-find a spellbook, become a knight, own a horse, send 100 gold pieces back home-then see how it empowers your character to want something so easily achieved. No no EASILY achieved Because once you accomplish a goal, your character changes.Step 4: Write the Game Story. When you have your world, your characters, and your Grand Story, it is time to take a tiny little piece of all that fluff. It is like framing a photo so that only a little bit is visible. You zoom in, and leave things out. Only tell the things that are important.A physical or mental disability can be considered a "flaw" simply because being disabled is a limitation in most societies, whereas physical tics and a tendency to misuse words would qualify as quirks. #2: Major Flaw. This is a flaw that hinders the character in a way that impacts the plot of the story. For example: purple circus strain headchange Giving the Villain a Backstory Download Article 1 Give the villain a distinct name. Their name should make them stand out from the crowd and give off sinister undertones. It may relate to a nickname they were given as a child or to an event in their past. It may also connect to their physical features. [7]He learned to use his gift to survive and even feel a false love from others. He wasn't a villain, but a man who didn't know right from wrong. When Maleficent came out, people finally understood why she was so "evil". Her wings were taken from her by a man she fell in love with. She was hurt, scared, and felt betrayed.Featuring a convenient guide of villain motives to help you Build-Your-Own Bad Guy. Twirly mustaches, prominent cheekbones, long-haired cats, and other accessories not included.The infamous quote of a child singing when Momo appears on a cartoon.Momo, Momo, Momo is going to kill you. Do you want a surprise? Look in her eyes. I will not lie, you're going to die.A line from the Momo Challenge Song. Momo is an Internet urban legend originating in 2018. She appears to be a young woman with long black hair, huge bulging eyes, a huge mouth with a big smile, and she appears ...A well-written villain is not simply an exaggeration of evil qualities personified. Watch Your Language. Don't make the villain sound too villainy. Avoid the temptation to give your villain flowery language that doesn't sound like the rest of the characters in your story. Your villain doesn't need to sound eloquent at all.It makes your villain want to strike up a friendship. Buy them a drink. Trade some stories. Find out they have a few other things in common, including not being entirely evil. For complementarity: The partner is good at something your villain isn't good at. This could, for example, just be humor, the partner's jokes make him laugh.It makes your villain want to strike up a friendship. Buy them a drink. Trade some stories. Find out they have a few other things in common, including not being entirely evil. For complementarity: The partner is good at something your villain isn't good at. This could, for example, just be humor, the partner's jokes make him laugh.Sep 16, 2021 · Building Backstory for the Villain Download Article 1 Use an existing person as a model for the villain. To help you get inspiration for your villain, you may a person who already exists that you find terrifying or scary. This could be your older sibling, a family friend, or a celebrity. Step 4: Write the Game Story. When you have your world, your characters, and your Grand Story, it is time to take a tiny little piece of all that fluff. It is like framing a photo so that only a little bit is visible. You zoom in, and leave things out. Only tell the things that are important.Sometimes you can get away with heroes who are innately moral, but with villains, the backstory should drive the decisions they make. When you write a good backstory, the villainous main character will seem less villainous because the reader understands why they do what they do. When done right, padding your characters' backstories should ...Instead, show the history behind your villain's behaviour. To make your villain a complex product of their own backstory and their society, show the personal attributes (psychology and backstory) and external circumstances (societal values and norms) that contribute to or enable their behaviour. 3: Show how your villain wasn't always the bad guyAnswer (1 of 5): I HATE back stories for villains. Sure, sometimes it's needed for certain films, however, when you're dealing with franchise films or tent pole studio flicks meant for entertainment, I all too often HATE back stories. And from a screenwriting perspective, when people attempt ...I'm working on motivating my villain (ess) and have found 39 possible motivations. I'm sure there are more, but these should jump start your imagination. They are presented here with a statement from the villain (ess)'s point of view. Romance: I want to marry the princess. Revenge - ruin a hero: I want to ruin the King.So conjure a backstory for your villain. Make him real and believable and credible—even attractive in many ways. And while you're writing your story, see how many boxes you can check off on this list of characteristics that pertain to your villain. The more that apply, the more successful your novel is likely to be.5. Have a devious sense of humor. Develop a dark sense of humor like the Joker, especially if you're playing a villain with a more comedic role. Find something funny that may be horrifying to others. Humor will help make your villain more relatable and likable to an audience.2. The beast: A classic villain whose goal is to terrorize and attempt to defeat the main character, the beast is a literal monster. This type of villain cannot be reasoned with and is often found in the horror or science fiction genres. The whale from Moby Dick and the shark from Jaws are examples of this type of villain.No! Not at all! 'Villain' is a character archetype. A person or creature that is evil, wicked, wants to harm the protagonist. Antagonists don't have to 'be evil' to be antagonists. Stay with me here. Your character is on a soccer team. They're one of the best players, and are in a tournament. If their team.If Disney decides to continue down the villain story route, perhaps they need to make better choices about what villains they're focusing on. Maybe they need to pick villains that it would be...First, Focus on the Villain. To maintain control over where and how you add information about your villain, first, you need to know your villain well. A rich character background allows you to pull various pieces of information out and plant them in your story. Think of your background as data collection. Then drip various pieces of information ...Being intentional in the way your villain's story ties to your hero's can add depth to both characters and to your story. 4. Your Reader Should Hope the Villain Loses. At the end of the day, no one could really root for Killmonger. He killed dozens of innocent people and wanted to create world-wide anarchy.Being intentional in the way your villain's story ties to your hero's can add depth to both characters and to your story. 4. Your Reader Should Hope the Villain Loses. At the end of the day, no one could really root for Killmonger. He killed dozens of innocent people and wanted to create world-wide anarchy.If there is some emotional torment keeping your protagonist from accomplishing what he needs to, there should be a solid history to back it up. Write a complete history for all your characters before you begin, even if you use only enough to give the audience insight into your hero's psyche. Plot your story around the emotional aspect of the story.Villains weren't always villains "This is a sure sign of a cheesy villain," says the editor, "no sense of backstory." "I have a backstory," says the woman holding the syringe. As she steps forward, the dark mage identifies the undeniable strut of the femme fatale. "Go on," says the editor. "I'm a Russian spy, sent to…"He learned to use his gift to survive and even feel a false love from others. He wasn't a villain, but a man who didn't know right from wrong. When Maleficent came out, people finally understood why she was so "evil". Her wings were taken from her by a man she fell in love with. She was hurt, scared, and felt betrayed.Chris Colfer. "I prefer a real villain to a false hero.". Killer Mike. "One may smile, and smile, and be a villain.". William Shakespeare. "Well, I think there are no villains in this world. There are just misunderstood heroes.". Tom Hiddleston. A villain must be a thing of power, handled with delicacy and grace.Creating a good background for each of your main characters is essential to making lovable characters and fan favorites. Don't forget about your bad guys, either! Any good villain needs a solid backstory to explain why they strayed from the path of morality. For more tips, check out How to Write Good Villains in Fiction.He learned to use his gift to survive and even feel a false love from others. He wasn't a villain, but a man who didn't know right from wrong. When Maleficent came out, people finally understood why she was so "evil". Her wings were taken from her by a man she fell in love with. She was hurt, scared, and felt betrayed.1. Humanity. It's almost cliché to describe a great villain as "a character you love to hate," so let's flip the script—your antagonist should be somebody you hate to love as well. In other words, your readers should be able to relate to your Big Bad Evil Guy in some way, no matter how big, bad, or evil he is.A Naruto roleplay quiz this part is just the back story and the genin test. I finally finished it :D, mainly for females but it doesn't really matter ... Movies Personality Test Disney Princess Villain Just For Fun. Cause the good guys are just so passé! Add to library 15 Discussion 3. Your StalkerXYandere BackStory [The End] ...Backstory. Whether you're writing a hero or a villain, backstory is important. One note characters who are just evil for the heck of it or good because that's what's right are boring. Throw a wrench in your readers' expectations by giving villains something sympathetic in their background. The villain doesn't have to be beloved.They're still a villain, but you can sympathise with their plight, even if it's just a little. Backstory. A villain's backstory doesn't always make it into the book. Whether you are going to write it in or not, you have to know their story as well as you know the hero's. Without a backstory neither you nor the reader will care for the ...I'm working on motivating my villain (ess) and have found 39 possible motivations. I'm sure there are more, but these should jump start your imagination. They are presented here with a statement from the villain (ess)'s point of view. Romance: I want to marry the princess. Revenge - ruin a hero: I want to ruin the King.Step 4: Write the Game Story. When you have your world, your characters, and your Grand Story, it is time to take a tiny little piece of all that fluff. It is like framing a photo so that only a little bit is visible. You zoom in, and leave things out. Only tell the things that are important.I'm working on motivating my villain (ess) and have found 39 possible motivations. I'm sure there are more, but these should jump start your imagination. They are presented here with a statement from the villain (ess)'s point of view. Romance: I want to marry the princess. Revenge - ruin a hero: I want to ruin the King.2. Make your monsters lovable. If you think about the most endearing—and enduring—characters in the history of literature they are the ones that are not simply portrayed as black and white evil, but with shades of coloring. Think about Dracula—he is a monster but he has huge charisma and charm.Read on for our top 6 reasons villains are better than heroes: 1. They're complex. Don't you get tired of the shiny, golden, all-around good guy hero trope? How can anyone be that perfect? Our favorite villains have a back story as to why they're evil, and it's soooo much more interesting watching the decisions they make because of it. 2.How can I create a good villian backstory +3 votes . 131 views. asked May 3, 2021 in How-To by Thalia. Ok 1. A beautiful sweet girl who is a villain 2. Your average teenager I,m terrible at thinking of motives. #advice;Backstory. Whether you're writing a hero or a villain, backstory is important. One note characters who are just evil for the heck of it or good because that's what's right are boring. Throw a wrench in your readers' expectations by giving villains something sympathetic in their background. The villain doesn't have to be beloved.Being intentional in the way your villain's story ties to your hero's can add depth to both characters and to your story. 4. Your Reader Should Hope the Villain Loses. At the end of the day, no one could really root for Killmonger. He killed dozens of innocent people and wanted to create world-wide anarchy.A villain's motivation isn't a straight line. It's easy to fall into certain patterns when writing villains; one of the most frequent being to draw a straight line between an event from their past and their actions in the present. Someone murdered their loved one, therefore they seek revenge. Someone injured them, therefore they want to ...Chris Colfer. "I prefer a real villain to a false hero.". Killer Mike. "One may smile, and smile, and be a villain.". William Shakespeare. "Well, I think there are no villains in this world. There are just misunderstood heroes.". Tom Hiddleston. A villain must be a thing of power, handled with delicacy and grace.A villain's motivation isn't a straight line. It's easy to fall into certain patterns when writing villains; one of the most frequent being to draw a straight line between an event from their past and their actions in the present. Someone murdered their loved one, therefore they seek revenge. Someone injured them, therefore they want to ...I'm working on motivating my villain (ess) and have found 39 possible motivations. I'm sure there are more, but these should jump start your imagination. They are presented here with a statement from the villain (ess)'s point of view. Romance: I want to marry the princess. Revenge - ruin a hero: I want to ruin the King.How To Write A Memorable Villain: Let your theme influence their traits Use their backstory to show why they're like this Humanise your villain. Show why they became corrupted Memorable injuries are clichés. Avoid To compete with the protagonist, your villain also needs to be special Your villain should feel unbeatable, at least for a whileHow good is your story's villain? MONTEAGLE.aquila. 1. 15. First things first, let's just get a few things out of the way. I'm going to be using the terms fairly interchangeably here, but villains and antagonists are not the same - villains are characters with bad or evil traits, and antagonists are characters who oppose or try to stop the ...Tragic Backstories: 10 Subtle Traumas For Your D&D Backstory. Tragic backstories and D&D seem to go together like peanut butter and jelly. Whether it's orcs killing your parents, your home village getting burned to the ground, or being the lone "good" drow elf, having some darkness in your past can often make a very interesting D&D character.Design your own evil character with an effective backstory that gives your supervillain motivation from start to finish. 8. Create an intriguing and clashing relationship between both the hero and the supervillain. They may be complete opposites, but they should have just as convincing histories and motives. 9.I'm working on motivating my villain (ess) and have found 39 possible motivations. I'm sure there are more, but these should jump start your imagination. They are presented here with a statement from the villain (ess)'s point of view. Romance: I want to marry the princess. Revenge - ruin a hero: I want to ruin the King.They're still a villain, but you can sympathise with their plight, even if it's just a little. Backstory. A villain's backstory doesn't always make it into the book. Whether you are going to write it in or not, you have to know their story as well as you know the hero's. Without a backstory neither you nor the reader will care for the ...A Naruto roleplay quiz this part is just the back story and the genin test. I finally finished it :D, mainly for females but it doesn't really matter ... Movies Personality Test Disney Princess Villain Just For Fun. Cause the good guys are just so passé! Add to library 15 Discussion 3. Your StalkerXYandere BackStory [The End] ...Building off this, a good way to gain sympathy is to make the villain the same as one of the heroes, except they went down a darker path. The hero could a victim of war. As a result of this, they seek to deepen political relations with the society that they warred with, thus lowering the chance of war breaking out between them again. evergreen cemetery plot map Sometimes you can get away with heroes who are innately moral, but with villains, the backstory should drive the decisions they make. When you write a good backstory, the villainous main character will seem less villainous because the reader understands why they do what they do. When done right, padding your characters' backstories should ...A Naruto roleplay quiz this part is just the back story and the genin test. I finally finished it :D, mainly for females but it doesn't really matter ... Movies Personality Test Disney Princess Villain Just For Fun. Cause the good guys are just so passé! Add to library 15 Discussion 3. Your StalkerXYandere BackStory [The End] ...It's either a way to introduce your characters, show their ending, or reveal their plan. you can use them to tell the backstory, to show what drives them, or even to subvert audience expectations. You want to brainstorm where the monologue will occur first, then work out what it needs to say in the individual scene first. Then work backward.The motivation will not completely exonerate your villain from his actions, but it will give the reader a reason to believe him. "Great characters need to be real, engaging, and motivating; they need to keep the reader reading. They need to touch something in the reader; so that they are remembered.". Magdalena Ball.5. Have a devious sense of humor. Develop a dark sense of humor like the Joker, especially if you're playing a villain with a more comedic role. Find something funny that may be horrifying to others. Humor will help make your villain more relatable and likable to an audience.Answer (1 of 7): MOTIVATION Im my opinion the villain in any novel needs a strong Goal and motivation. He shouldn't do evil works just because he is villain, his motivation should seem rational and big. SMARTNESS He need not be cruel or psychotic or mentally unstable but he definitely needs to...Sometimes you can get away with heroes who are innately moral, but with villains, the backstory should drive the decisions they make. When you write a good backstory, the villainous main character will seem less villainous because the reader understands why they do what they do. When done right, padding your characters' backstories should ...And because of that, General Hummel has more depth and is more engaging as a villain. 2. Colonel Hans Landa in Inglorious Basterds. Landa's monologue offers us a haunting look into the utter evil of the Nazi mindset. He goes on about rats, questioning the farmer on why there is such instant disdain for the rodent.A Simple Guide for Writing a GREAT Character Backstory. Complexity is the enemy of clarity. So here is a simple formula. Turn back the clock, if you will, all the way to the creation of your character's backstory. No, Tommy, not literally. It's a figure of speech. Besides, Tommy, that's an analog clock. You'd just be spinning….Make the villain a mystery the heroes have to solve, and then it will feel natural when the heroes dig up the villain's backstory and puzzle out their clever plan. For instance, in the Harry Potter books, Harry has every reason to study old accounts about Voldemort and theorize about the villain's motivations.Sep 16, 2021 · Building Backstory for the Villain Download Article 1 Use an existing person as a model for the villain. To help you get inspiration for your villain, you may a person who already exists that you find terrifying or scary. This could be your older sibling, a family friend, or a celebrity. When developing your villain, think of them as you would your protagonist. They need all the same things: backstory, motive, dreams, strengths, weaknesses, appearance, and tailored dialogue. If your antagonist is not fully realized, lacks depth or is a caricature of evil, your story will suffer."—. Laura DiSilverio.Creating a good background for each of your main characters is essential to making lovable characters and fan favorites. Don't forget about your bad guys, either! Any good villain needs a solid backstory to explain why they strayed from the path of morality. For more tips, check out How to Write Good Villains in Fiction.A Simple Guide for Writing a GREAT Character Backstory. Complexity is the enemy of clarity. So here is a simple formula. Turn back the clock, if you will, all the way to the creation of your character's backstory. No, Tommy, not literally. It's a figure of speech. Besides, Tommy, that's an analog clock. You'd just be spinning….Scene #2: The First Look. First impressions are important. The first time we see your villain at work, we need to be wowed. It's that first crime, that first harsh word, that first evil glance that will set the tone for your villain. Take the introduction of Hannibal Lecter in The Silence of the Lambs.No! Not at all! 'Villain' is a character archetype. A person or creature that is evil, wicked, wants to harm the protagonist. Antagonists don't have to 'be evil' to be antagonists. Stay with me here. Your character is on a soccer team. They're one of the best players, and are in a tournament. If their team. houses for rent brackley A Simple Guide for Writing a GREAT Character Backstory. Complexity is the enemy of clarity. So here is a simple formula. Turn back the clock, if you will, all the way to the creation of your character's backstory. No, Tommy, not literally. It's a figure of speech. Besides, Tommy, that's an analog clock. You'd just be spinning….Step 4: Write the Game Story. When you have your world, your characters, and your Grand Story, it is time to take a tiny little piece of all that fluff. It is like framing a photo so that only a little bit is visible. You zoom in, and leave things out. Only tell the things that are important.First, Focus on the Villain. To maintain control over where and how you add information about your villain, first, you need to know your villain well. A rich character background allows you to pull various pieces of information out and plant them in your story. Think of your background as data collection. Then drip various pieces of information ...The evil villain generator generates evil villains, the evil villain plot and how the evil villain dies. ... I've always wanted a good evil villain generator, but this one is by far the best i_killed_cupid 2021-10-17 16:29:28. This is the best evil villain name generator I've ever used! There are so many options to choose from and they are all ...Tragic Backstories: 10 Subtle Traumas For Your D&D Backstory. Tragic backstories and D&D seem to go together like peanut butter and jelly. Whether it's orcs killing your parents, your home village getting burned to the ground, or being the lone "good" drow elf, having some darkness in your past can often make a very interesting D&D character.3) Make your villain a real threat. As pointed out earlier, the villain needs to be a worthy adversary, capable of causing the hero pain. You need to strike a balance so that the antagonist and protagonist are nearly equal in strength and/or intelligence. Otherwise, your readers won't be convinced that the villain is a real threat.The richer a backstory the villain has, the more players will feel engaged with it. Having a good backstory will also make it easier to act out a character for those looking to role-play as them .A villain is an "evil" character in a story, whether a historical narrative or, especially, a work of fiction. The villain is usually the bad guy or antagonist, the character who fights against the hero or protagonist.A female villain is sometimes called a villainess.Random House Unabridged Dictionary defines villain as "a cruelly malicious person who is involved in or devoted to wickedness or ...Here are 5 quick steps to create kick-ass villains. 1. Understand Their Why. Some people use character interviews or sheets to develop their villain; others wing it as they go. Both ways work. But the one vital piece of information you do need to know is - why your villain is doing what he's doing.A Simple Guide for Writing a GREAT Character Backstory. Complexity is the enemy of clarity. So here is a simple formula. Turn back the clock, if you will, all the way to the creation of your character's backstory. No, Tommy, not literally. It's a figure of speech. Besides, Tommy, that's an analog clock. You'd just be spinning….Villains weren't always villains "This is a sure sign of a cheesy villain," says the editor, "no sense of backstory." "I have a backstory," says the woman holding the syringe. As she steps forward, the dark mage identifies the undeniable strut of the femme fatale. "Go on," says the editor. "I'm a Russian spy, sent to…"Maleficent is a fictional character who appears in Walt Disney Pictures' 16th animated feature film, Sleeping Beauty (1959). She is an evil fairy and the self-proclaimed "Mistress of All Evil" who, after not being invited to a christening, curses the infant Princess Aurora to "prick her finger on the spindle of a spinning wheel and die ...Featuring a convenient guide of villain motives to help you Build-Your-Own Bad Guy. Twirly mustaches, prominent cheekbones, long-haired cats, and other accessories not included.Maleficent is a fictional character who appears in Walt Disney Pictures' 16th animated feature film, Sleeping Beauty (1959). She is an evil fairy and the self-proclaimed "Mistress of All Evil" who, after not being invited to a christening, curses the infant Princess Aurora to "prick her finger on the spindle of a spinning wheel and die ...Here's a quick overview followed by a full analysis: A mysterious lion plants the seeds of rebellion in young Scar's mind The lion's snake ally injects Scar with personality-altering poison Corrupted and betrayed, Scar kills the snake and lion Mufasa dismisses this encounter, enraging ScarThe four main types of antagonists. 1. The one you love to hate. Otherwise known as "the mustache-twirling bad guy.". These characters just get in your hero's way. Your hero wants to save the world while this antagonist wants to destroy it. Your hero wants to marry the prince, this antagonist wants him all to herself - not because the ...Building Backstory for the Villain Download Article 1 Use an existing person as a model for the villain. To help you get inspiration for your villain, you may a person who already exists that you find terrifying or scary. This could be your older sibling, a family friend, or a celebrity.Instead, show the history behind your villain’s behaviour. To make your villain a complex product of their own backstory and their society, show the personal attributes (psychology and backstory) and external circumstances (societal values and norms) that contribute to or enable their behaviour. 3: Show how your villain wasn’t always the bad guy A villain, disfigured and quite mad, bursts into the protagonists life, does X terrible thing which sends our hero back in time but also make him immortal. Our hero spends an eternity wandering, living a thousand lives through the ages as he slowly continues his journey back to his time.5. Have a devious sense of humor. Develop a dark sense of humor like the Joker, especially if you're playing a villain with a more comedic role. Find something funny that may be horrifying to others. Humor will help make your villain more relatable and likable to an audience.Every good villain has finesse. It's what sets them apart from the "goons" or the basic "bad guys" in the movie or show. They possess a certain style that sets them apart from the others in a completely different way. Example: a Joker goon vs The Joker himself.-Character. The villain has to have a reason for being "the villain".The four main types of antagonists. 1. The one you love to hate. Otherwise known as "the mustache-twirling bad guy.". These characters just get in your hero's way. Your hero wants to save the world while this antagonist wants to destroy it. Your hero wants to marry the prince, this antagonist wants him all to herself - not because the ...Your villain must be suitable and specifically adept at preventing the thematic success of your hero, hence must embody a negative version of that theme. 2. Create A Compelling Backstory So, once you have understood your theme and decided which negative version of the theme is embodied by your villain, you next ask yourself why they are like this.First, Focus on the Villain. To maintain control over where and how you add information about your villain, first, you need to know your villain well. A rich character background allows you to pull various pieces of information out and plant them in your story. Think of your background as data collection. Then drip various pieces of information ...No! Not at all! 'Villain' is a character archetype. A person or creature that is evil, wicked, wants to harm the protagonist. Antagonists don't have to 'be evil' to be antagonists. Stay with me here. Your character is on a soccer team. They're one of the best players, and are in a tournament. If their team.Letting the villain get the upper hand helps your story in two ways: it sets the hero back, and helps reinforce the villain's belief that their actions are justified. In the Star Wars saga, Darth Vader is often near triumph. He defeats Obi-Wan Kenobi, killing the one man he believed still had any sway over the Force that could oppose him.The motivation will not completely exonerate your villain from his actions, but it will give the reader a reason to believe him. "Great characters need to be real, engaging, and motivating; they need to keep the reader reading. They need to touch something in the reader; so that they are remembered.". Magdalena Ball.Here's a quick overview followed by a full analysis: A mysterious lion plants the seeds of rebellion in young Scar's mind The lion's snake ally injects Scar with personality-altering poison Corrupted and betrayed, Scar kills the snake and lion Mufasa dismisses this encounter, enraging Scar5. Make her redeemable. This is the reason why the antagonist's backstory is important, and so are her values and reasons behind her actions. You can make her character redeemable. This does not mean that she will go down the path of redemption and become a protagonist. All you need to present is the possibility.Creating a good villain takes as much work as creating a player character. They should have their own backstory, morals, and goals. The most effective villain is relatable, confident, and flawed. Try out these suggestions the next time you create a Big Bad for your campaign. Happy DMing!They're still a villain, but you can sympathise with their plight, even if it's just a little. Backstory. A villain's backstory doesn't always make it into the book. Whether you are going to write it in or not, you have to know their story as well as you know the hero's. Without a backstory neither you nor the reader will care for the ...Creating a good background for each of your main characters is essential to making lovable characters and fan favorites. Don't forget about your bad guys, either! Any good villain needs a solid backstory to explain why they strayed from the path of morality. For more tips, check out How to Write Good Villains in Fiction.He learned to use his gift to survive and even feel a false love from others. He wasn't a villain, but a man who didn't know right from wrong. When Maleficent came out, people finally understood why she was so "evil". Her wings were taken from her by a man she fell in love with. She was hurt, scared, and felt betrayed.A villain is an "evil" character in a story, whether a historical narrative or, especially, a work of fiction. The villain is usually the bad guy or antagonist, the character who fights against the hero or protagonist.A female villain is sometimes called a villainess.Random House Unabridged Dictionary defines villain as "a cruelly malicious person who is involved in or devoted to wickedness or ...5. Have a devious sense of humor. Develop a dark sense of humor like the Joker, especially if you're playing a villain with a more comedic role. Find something funny that may be horrifying to others. Humor will help make your villain more relatable and likable to an audience.The infamous quote of a child singing when Momo appears on a cartoon.Momo, Momo, Momo is going to kill you. Do you want a surprise? Look in her eyes. I will not lie, you're going to die.A line from the Momo Challenge Song. Momo is an Internet urban legend originating in 2018. She appears to be a young woman with long black hair, huge bulging eyes, a huge mouth with a big smile, and she appears ...Villain character generator. This easy to use tool will help create an outline of a villain (or any other character for that matter) for RPG games, but it could just as easily be used for other purposes if you see fit. The tool consists of a bunch of fields, including one for a name, stats, characteristics, and two fields for additional ...So conjure a backstory for your villain. Make him real and believable and credible—even attractive in many ways. And while you're writing your story, see how many boxes you can check off on this list of characteristics that pertain to your villain. The more that apply, the more successful your novel is likely to be.When developing your villain, think of them as you would your protagonist. They need all the same things: backstory, motive, dreams, strengths, weaknesses, appearance, and tailored dialogue. If your antagonist is not fully realized, lacks depth or is a caricature of evil, your story will suffer."—. Laura DiSilverio.Here's how to write a D&D backstory: You create a D&D backstory by developing a character concept, writing 2-3 representative personality traits, highlighting 3-5 pivotal life events, and defining their fears, obsessions, secrets, motivations, family, and appearance. You can also use a template and automatic background generator.Learn how to write villain motivations that make sense: 1. Explain villain motivations via backstory 2. Show the power your villain has over others 3. Explain how they get away with villainy 4. Give your villains weaknesses or vulnerabilities 5. Make your villains develop too 6. Summarize famous villains' motivations to learn by exampleStep 3: Craft a good backstory for your villain As mentioned above, one of the traits of a really believable villain is having a good backstory. This means, their backstory kind of makes what they're doing understandable (not totally though). If they want control, there must be a reason for it.Both sociopaths and psychopaths are defined in the DSM-5 (the official book used to define/treat mental health) as being antisocial personality disorders. However, sociopaths and psychopaths still have their differences. Where psychopaths are cool and calculating, sociopaths are impulsive and unreliable. You could make your character's friend ...First, Focus on the Villain. To maintain control over where and how you add information about your villain, first, you need to know your villain well. A rich character background allows you to pull various pieces of information out and plant them in your story. Think of your background as data collection. Then drip various pieces of information ...They're still a villain, but you can sympathise with their plight, even if it's just a little. Backstory. A villain's backstory doesn't always make it into the book. Whether you are going to write it in or not, you have to know their story as well as you know the hero's. Without a backstory neither you nor the reader will care for the ...Step 3: Craft a good backstory for your villain As mentioned above, one of the traits of a really believable villain is having a good backstory. This means, their backstory kind of makes what they're doing understandable (not totally though). If they want control, there must be a reason for it.5. Make her redeemable. This is the reason why the antagonist's backstory is important, and so are her values and reasons behind her actions. You can make her character redeemable. This does not mean that she will go down the path of redemption and become a protagonist. All you need to present is the possibility.Answer (1 of 7): MOTIVATION Im my opinion the villain in any novel needs a strong Goal and motivation. He shouldn't do evil works just because he is villain, his motivation should seem rational and big. SMARTNESS He need not be cruel or psychotic or mentally unstable but he definitely needs to...The value of backstory. Take 60% as a minimum of unrevealed backstory, and try to decide on as much of your character's life as possible. The more backstory you know the more realistic the character will be, and the more realistic the 40% you actually share will feel. Believability lies in seemingly inconsequential details, and it's ...How To Write A Memorable Villain: Let your theme influence their traits Use their backstory to show why they're like this Humanise your villain. Show why they became corrupted Memorable injuries are clichés. Avoid To compete with the protagonist, your villain also needs to be special Your villain should feel unbeatable, at least for a whileRead on for our top 6 reasons villains are better than heroes: 1. They're complex. Don't you get tired of the shiny, golden, all-around good guy hero trope? How can anyone be that perfect? Our favorite villains have a back story as to why they're evil, and it's soooo much more interesting watching the decisions they make because of it. 2.Sure, they're fun to put in and it's tempting to throw as much trauma at your main character as possible, but if it doesn't add anything to your story it's not going to impact your readers much. It's a pity to waste a good tragic backstory, so make sure it's doing its job. 2. Do the readers need to know what it is?5. Have a devious sense of humor. Develop a dark sense of humor like the Joker, especially if you're playing a villain with a more comedic role. Find something funny that may be horrifying to others. Humor will help make your villain more relatable and likable to an audience.How To Write A Memorable Villain: Let your theme influence their traits Use their backstory to show why they're like this Humanise your villain. Show why they became corrupted Memorable injuries are clichés. Avoid To compete with the protagonist, your villain also needs to be special Your villain should feel unbeatable, at least for a whileThe best villains are fully developed human beings. Unless you’re writing fantasy or sci fi with demons and so on, in which case your demons probably should also be fully developed beings with wants and needs, strengths and weaknesses, and all the rest of what goes into creating a character. Alisha Garcia Lives in Gonzales Texas 1 y Sometimes you can get away with heroes who are innately moral, but with villains, the backstory should drive the decisions they make. When you write a good backstory, the villainous main character will seem less villainous because the reader understands why they do what they do. When done right, padding your characters' backstories should ...Making a Backstory for your Villain. Backstory is an important aspect of creating any character. This is especially true for villains, since a villain's past often justifies their motives and goals in the story. Revealing a villain's past should give at least a little insight into why they behave the way that they do.Thanks for the tip! It's crazy you said that, as at this moment in time, I am attempting to develop the villain's backstory! I already have a few ideas in mind for them but they are proving really difficult to develop, as their backstory is closely related to that of some other supporting characters, some of whom's backstories are pretty well developed already.Step 3: Craft a good backstory for your villain As mentioned above, one of the traits of a really believable villain is having a good backstory. This means, their backstory kind of makes what they're doing understandable (not totally though). If they want control, there must be a reason for it.2. The beast: A classic villain whose goal is to terrorize and attempt to defeat the main character, the beast is a literal monster. This type of villain cannot be reasoned with and is often found in the horror or science fiction genres. The whale from Moby Dick and the shark from Jaws are examples of this type of villain.It makes your villain want to strike up a friendship. Buy them a drink. Trade some stories. Find out they have a few other things in common, including not being entirely evil. For complementarity: The partner is good at something your villain isn't good at. This could, for example, just be humor, the partner's jokes make him laugh.No! Not at all! 'Villain' is a character archetype. A person or creature that is evil, wicked, wants to harm the protagonist. Antagonists don't have to 'be evil' to be antagonists. Stay with me here. Your character is on a soccer team. They're one of the best players, and are in a tournament. If their team.First up, what makes a good superpower? "That is one of the most difficult things to come up with when doing a story, because it's as though they've all been done," Lee said. "Super strength, the...Letting the villain get the upper hand helps your story in two ways: it sets the hero back, and helps reinforce the villain's belief that their actions are justified. In the Star Wars saga, Darth Vader is often near triumph. He defeats Obi-Wan Kenobi, killing the one man he believed still had any sway over the Force that could oppose him.Tragic Backstories: 10 Subtle Traumas For Your D&D Backstory. Tragic backstories and D&D seem to go together like peanut butter and jelly. Whether it's orcs killing your parents, your home village getting burned to the ground, or being the lone "good" drow elf, having some darkness in your past can often make a very interesting D&D character.Design your own evil character with an effective backstory that gives your supervillain motivation from start to finish. 8. Create an intriguing and clashing relationship between both the hero and the supervillain. They may be complete opposites, but they should have just as convincing histories and motives. 9.Here's how to write a D&D backstory: You create a D&D backstory by developing a character concept, writing 2-3 representative personality traits, highlighting 3-5 pivotal life events, and defining their fears, obsessions, secrets, motivations, family, and appearance. You can also use a template and automatic background generator.The Riddler is a prime example of the fun to be had by a Batman B-lister. While the majority of Batman villains are fairly heavy hitters, Edward Nygma just gets to kick around Gotham City leaving ...Make the villain a mystery the heroes have to solve, and then it will feel natural when the heroes dig up the villain's backstory and puzzle out their clever plan. For instance, in the Harry Potter books, Harry has every reason to study old accounts about Voldemort and theorize about the villain's motivations.This backstory description generator will generate a fairly random description of either a fortunate or unfortunate backstory depending on your choice. These backstories will fit respectable characters best, though some could be used for villainous characters as well. But there will be a separate backstory generator for villains in the future.A Simple Guide for Writing a GREAT Character Backstory. Complexity is the enemy of clarity. So here is a simple formula. Turn back the clock, if you will, all the way to the creation of your character's backstory. No, Tommy, not literally. It's a figure of speech. Besides, Tommy, that's an analog clock. You'd just be spinning….It's either a way to introduce your characters, show their ending, or reveal their plan. you can use them to tell the backstory, to show what drives them, or even to subvert audience expectations. You want to brainstorm where the monologue will occur first, then work out what it needs to say in the individual scene first. Then work backward.finally, you can hook readers by showing a character willing to give up or actually sacrificing a selfish goal for someone or something else, or for the greater good: like gandalf falling to the balrog in the fellowship of the ring to allow frodo to escape with the one true ring, or cyrano de bergerac sacrificing his own happiness for his love …My second book isn't a true sequel, i.e., the protagonist is different, and only one of the characters from the first story plays an active or dramatic role in the second story. She starts out as a friend and ends up being a villain, of sorts (not the typical villain; just someone with opposing interests.)This backstory description generator will generate a fairly random description of either a fortunate or unfortunate backstory depending on your choice. These backstories will fit respectable characters best, though some could be used for villainous characters as well. But there will be a separate backstory generator for villains in the future.Both sociopaths and psychopaths are defined in the DSM-5 (the official book used to define/treat mental health) as being antisocial personality disorders. However, sociopaths and psychopaths still have their differences. Where psychopaths are cool and calculating, sociopaths are impulsive and unreliable. You could make your character's friend ...My second book isn't a true sequel, i.e., the protagonist is different, and only one of the characters from the first story plays an active or dramatic role in the second story. 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